EE Student Information

Students

Sebastian Fernandez and Arynn Gallegos
February 2022

Sebastian Fernandez (EE PhD candidate), Arynn Gallegos (EE PhD candidate), Claire Anderson (Environmental Engineering PhD candidate) and Chandler Brown (Environmental Engineering PhD candidate) organized SERI as a means of providing students with the tools they need to successfully complete undergraduate research and apply to graduate school.

 

"Stanford Engineering Research Introductions (SERI) aims to empower underrepresented underclassmen at Stanford and other institutions to achieve their academic and professional goals both in college and after graduation, state Sebastian and Arynn.

"The program's fundamental objectives are to expose students early in their undergraduate careers to academic research, provide graduate student and faculty mentoring, and cultivate a community of likeminded and diverse scholars."

SERI's inaugural conference kicked off Friday, February 4, 2022. The two-day event included faculty panels, graduate student panels, lab tours, seminars, and research presentations by faculty.

EE professors Dan Congreve and Chelsea Finn gave presentations on their research. Dan's research includes controlling light at the nanoscale. And Chelsea presented on broad robot generalization with broad offline data. Additional engineering faculty participated in panels, lab tours, and workshops.

Conference participants said they learned a lot and are now more clear on the path to becoming a graduate student.

SERI organizers are grateful to the EE department for generously supporting and sponsoring this program, as well as VPGE Diversity and Inclusion Innovation Funds and the ChemE, CEE, and CS departments.

 

"We look forward to hosting the program in future years to reach and impact the next generation of diverse scientists and engineers."

SERI graduate student directors, from left to right, Sebastian Fernandez, Claire Anderson, Chandler Brown, and Arynn Gallegos

 

SERI directors

SERI organizers and participants pose for a group photo at the engineering quad. (Photo courtesy of SERI organizers).

 

Sources: SERI - seri.sites.stanford.edu, The Stanford Daily, "Stanford welcomes students to Engineering Research Introductions Conference," Feb 7, 2022

November 2021

Thanks to everyone who participated in EE's Gingerbread Contest!


Fourteen teams stepped up to the challenge of building a gingerbread house. EE's Student Services hosted the festive event in the Packard Building's atrium with plenty of music, food, fun, and of course, sweets.

The judges included John DeSilva, Mary K. McMahon, and Priyanka Raina. Judging criteria included completeness, creativity, and technical skill.

 

  • 1st - RPicicle and the Gingerbreadboards: Liana Keesing, Matthew Trost, Maria Fernandez, and Anna Mistele
  • 2nd - Team 201: Surin Ahn, Ethan Liang, Emi Zeger
  • 3rd - Midnight Cobras: Calvin Lin, Jordy Mukania, Obi Nnorom, Jr., and Stefan Orosco
  • Honorable Mention - Paulipants Gingerbread Elves: Iliana Bray, Michael Silvernagel, Lisa Yamada, Alissa Ling

Thanks to all of our staff, faculty, and students for your enthusiastic participation!

 

Photos by Krystal Navarro and Chet Frost

Prof Tom Lee with an AM radio he made in elementary school. Photo credit Andrew Brodhead
November 2021

Professor Thomas Lee created and teaches an Introductory Seminar titled, "Things About Stuff." This engaging, student-driven course about invention has become a hit with many students. 

And the lack of strict definition is essential to what the course has become.

"I realized that this freedom was valuable because every group of students will have a different set of interests," says Tom. "Rather than fitting them into the course, why don't we fit the course to them?"

From the beginning, the course was a series of improvisations rather than a collection of pre-planned lectures. As Tom discusses the hidden histories of one invention, students raise questions about others, related or not. Curiosity drives the course trajectory – topics flow endlessly from one to another.

Students learn about the largely untold stories behind those devices, whose histories as recounted in history books and on Wikipedia are often truncated and linearized for ease and clarity.

The true annals of invention, however, tend to be much messier – and more interesting.

"My message to them is that there is rarely a linear narrative. Oftentimes, it's just little bits of art and random discoveries made centuries apart and in places distributed across the planet that alchemically combine to create a revolution," adds Tom.

Students not only hear histories of inventions but dabble in technology creation themselves. In the lab portion of the class, students power up calculators with batteries they make from pocket change and other household items, build spinning motors from hard drive scraps and improvise wireless communication systems with LEDs.

Tom Lee is the principal investigator of the SMIrC Lab, which has been a driving force in developing the theory of radio frequency (RF) CMOS integrated circuit design as well as in educating tomorrow's RFIC designers.

 

Excerpted from "Stanford course dives into untold histories of inventions," Nov 8, 2021. 

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image of prof H. Tom Soh
January 2021

EE Professor Tom Soh, in collaboration with Professor Eric Appel, and colleagues have developed a technology that can provide real time diagnostic information. Their device, which they've dubbed the "Real-time ELISA," is able to perform many blood tests very quickly and then stitch the individual results together to enable continuous, real-time monitoring of a patient's blood chemistry. Instead of a snapshot, the researchers end up with something more like a movie.

"A blood test is great, but it can't tell you, for example, whether insulin or glucose levels are increasing or decreasing in a patient," said Professor Tom Soh. "Knowing the direction of change is important."

In their recent study, "A fluorescence sandwich immunoassay for the real-time continuous detection of glucose and insulin in live animals", published in the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering, the researchers used the device to simultaneously detect insulin and glucose levels in living diabetic laboratory rats. But the researchers say their tool is capable of so much more because it can be easily modified to monitor virtually any protein or disease biomarker of interest.

Authors are PhD candidates Mahla Poudineh, Caitlin L. Maikawa, Eric Yue Ma, Jing Pan, Dan Mamerow, Yan Hang, Sam W. Baker, Ahmad Beirami, Alex Yoshikawa, researcher Michael Eisenstein, Professor Seung Kim, and Professor Jelena Vučković.

Technologically, the system relies upon an existing technology called Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay – ELISA ("ee-LYZ-ah") for short. ELISA has been the "gold standard" of biomolecular detection since the early 1970s and can identify virtually any peptide, protein, antibody or hormone in the blood. An ELISA assay is good at identifying allergies, for instance. It is also used to spot viruses like HIV, West Nile and the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

The Real-time ELISA is essentially an entire lab within a chip with tiny pipes and valves no wider than a human hair. An intravenous needle directs blood from the patient into the device's tiny circuits where ELISA is performed over and over.

 Excerpted from "Stanford researchers develop lab-on-a-chip that turns blood test snapshots into continuous movies", December 21, 2020.

Related News

image of Grayson Zulof, PhD and Thaibao Peter Phan, PhD
November 2020

Congratulations to Thaibao Phan (PhD candidate) and Grayson Zulauf (PhD '20)! Their paper was one of three selected to receive the Best Paper Award at the Control and Modeling in Power Electronics (COMPEL) Workshop 2020.

Grayson Zulauf (PhD '20) was a member of professor Juan Rivas-Davila's SUPER Lab, and Thaibao Phan (PhD candidate) is a member of professor Jonathan Fan's Fan Lab.

 

Their collaborative paper, "1 kW, Multi-MHz Wireless Charging for Electric Transportation" will be published on IEEExPLORE in the upcoming weeks.

 

Please join us in congratulating them on this wonderful accomplishment!

image of prof. Shanhui Fan
August 2020

Professor Shanhui Fan's rooftop cooling system could eventually help meet the need for nighttime lighting in urban areas, or provide lighting in developing countries.

Using commercially available technology, the research team has designed an off-grid, low-cost modular energy source that can efficiently produce power at night.

Although solar power brings many benefits, its use depends heavily on the distribution of sunlight, which can be limited in many locations and is completely unavailable at night. Systems that store energy produced during the day are typically expensive, thus driving up the cost of using solar power.

To find a less-expensive alternative, researchers led by professor Shanhui Fan looked to radiative cooling. Their approach uses the temperature difference resulting from heat absorbed from the surrounding air and the radiant cooling effect of cold space to generate electricity.

In The Optical Society (OSA) journal Optics Express, the researchers theoretically demonstrate an optimized radiative cooling approach that can generate 2.2 Watts per square meter with a rooftop device that doesn't require a battery or any external energy. This is about 120 times the amount of energy that has been experimentally demonstrated and enough to power modular sensors such as ones used in security or environmental applications.

"We are working to develop high-performance, sustainable lighting generation that can provide everyone–including those in developing and rural areas–access to reliable and sustainable low cost lighting energy sources," said Lingling Fan, EE PhD candidate and first author of the paper. "A modular energy source could also power off-grid sensors used in a variety of applications and be used to convert waste heat from automobiles into usable power."

Additional authors include Wei Li (EE PhD candidate), and post-doctoral researcher Weiliang Jin, PhD, and Meir Orenstein (Technion-Israel Institute of Technology).

 

 

Excerpted from Science Daily, "Efficient low-cost system for producing power at night".

 

image of professors Shenoy and Murmann
August 2020

The current generation of neural implants record enormous amounts of neural activity, then transmit these brain signals through wires to a computer. But, so far, when researchers have tried to create wireless brain-computer interfaces to do this, it took so much power to transmit the data that the implants generated too much heat to be safe for the patient. A new study suggests how to solve his problem -- and thus cut the wires.

Research led by Professors Krishna Shenoy, Boris Murmann and Dr. Jaimie Henderson, have shown how it would be possible to create a wireless device, capable of gathering and transmitting accurate neural signals, but using a tenth of the power required by current wire-enabled systems. These wireless devices would look more natural than the wired models and give patients freer range of motion.

Graduate student Nir Even-Chen and postdoctoral fellow Dante Muratore, PhD, describe the team's approach in a Nature Biomedical Engineering paper.

The next step will be to build an implant based on this new approach and proceed through a series of tests toward the ultimate goal.

 

 

Excerpted from Science News, "How thoughts could one day control electronic prostheses, wirelessly", August 5, 2020.

Stanford Class of 2020!
June 2020

Congratulations to our 2020 graduates

The Department of Electrical Engineering would like everyone to celebrate and congratulate all 2020 graduates!

It's been a challenging spring quarter, but you all made it through! Please join us to reflect on all of the work you did to get here. It hasn't been easy, and we want every student to know that we value your contributions and look forward to seeing where you go. Congratulations!

CONGRATULATIONS 2020 GRADUATES! From Dean Widom, Professor Stephen Boyd, Student Services, and others! youtu.be/kme9svWjo5A

 


Celebrating our graduates provides an opportunity to spotlight many awards and outstanding contributions by individuals. 

 

Design Awards

Undergraduate students that receive the Student Design Project Awards, have demonstrated novel innovation in their capstone projects. The 2020 recipients are Rohan Deshpande, BS '22 and Kao Kitichotkul, BS '22.


Centennial Teaching Assistant Award

The Centennial Award recognizes tremendous service and dedication in providing excellent classroom instruction. Students and faculty nominate outstanding teaching assistants throughout the year. The department is fortunate to have many highly skilled teaching assistants!

  • Jonathan Jia-An Mak, MS '20, BS '19
  • Lars Thorben Neustock, PhD '21
  • Chris Strong, MS '21

Jonathan Jia-An Mak, MS '20, BS '19Lars Thorben Neustock, PhD '21Chris Strong, MS '21


Ford Scholar Award

Milind Jagota, MS and BS '20 has received the Ford Scholar Award. Ford Scholars have the highest total GPA and Engineering GPAs in the School of Engineering and are pursuing an advanced degree. Milind will receive a Ford Scholar award certificate and $1,500 check. 

James F. Gibbons Outstanding Student Teaching Award 2020

The James F. Gibbons Award for Outstanding Student Teaching Award highlights students who have been nominated by faculty and peers for their extraordinary service as teaching assistants. We are deeply appreciative of the commitment to learning and sharing that our students display.

Congratulations to Elaine Chou, PhD '21, MS '18, Trisha Jani, MS '20, and Jonathan Lin, MS '20 and BS '19!


 

Chair's Award for Outstanding Contributions to Undergraduate Education:

This year's award recognizes Professor Joseph Kahn! In recognition of the tireless work he has done in the area of undergraduate education and contributions to the success of the department. Thank you!

 


Frederick Emmons Terman Engineering Scholastic Award

The Terman Award is presented to the top 5% of each senior class in the School of Engineering. We are pleased to congratulate our 2020 Terman Scholars for their outstanding work.

  • Anthony S. Degleris, BS '20
  • Milind Jagota, MS and BS '20
  • Joe Lou, MS (CS) and BS '20
  • Alex Mallery, BS '20
  • Eajer Toh, MS '21, BS '20

 

 

Tau Beta Pi (TBP) Teaching Honor Roll (The Engineering Honor Society)

This award recognizes engineering instructors for excellent teaching, commitment to students, and great mentoring. Professor Mary Wootters received this award for her excellent instruction and commitment – please join us in congratulating Mary for her extraordinary teaching!

Tau Beta Pi (TBP) Honor Roll (The Engineering Honor Society)

Anthony S. Degleris, BS '20
Milind Jagota, MS and BS '20
Joe Lou, MS (CS) and BS '20
Jacob Meisel, MS and BS '21 
Michael Oduoza, MS '22 and BS '21
Eajer Toh, MS '21, BS '20
Chris Wu, BS '20 and MS '21

Not pictured: Michal Adamkiewicz, Erick Blankenberg, Wyeth Coulter, Collin Cremers,  Rahul Lall, and Vineet Edupuganti.


Phi Beta Kappa

Seven EE students were elected to Phi Beta Kappa for their academic excellence and breadth of their scholarly accomplishments. Congratulations to all!


Zach Belateche, BS and MS '20
Anthony S. Degleris, BS '20
Milind Jagota, MS and BS '20
Joe Lou, MS (CS) and BS '20
Eajer Toh, MS '21, BS '20
Cole Winstanley, MS and BS '20

Not pictured: Gregorio Lopes, MS and BS '20 


Undergraduate Degrees with Distinction

In recognition of high scholastic attainment, distinction is awarded by the University to the top 15% of the graduating class based on cumulative grade point averages calculated at the end of Winter Quarter. Congratulations!

Zach Belateche, BS and MS '20
Anthony S. Degleris, BS '20 
Milind Jagota, MS and BS '20
Joe Lou, MS (CS) and BS '20
Alex Mallery, BS '20
Eajer Toh, MS '21 and BS '20
Chris Wu, BS '20 and MS '21 

 

Not pictured: Gregorio Lopes


EE Honors

These undergraduate students maintain a grade point average of at least 3.5 in Electrical Engineering courses and conduct independent study and research at an advanced level with a faculty mentor, graduate students, and fellow undergraduates. Congratulations!

Yap Dian Ang, MS (CS) and BS '20
Anthony S. Degleris
, BS '20
Milind Jagota, MS and BS '20
Alex Mallery, BS '20

YapDianAngAnthonyDeglerisMilindJagotaAlexMallery

2020 Graduates, be sure to add your page to the EE Yearbook!

The EE Yearbook is for all 2020 graduates and walk-through participants. The PDF yearbook will be available to the public in early July 2020 on our EE website: ee.stanford.edu/2020-graduates
 
 

Related Links

image of Cindy Nguyen, EE PhD candidate and Prof. Tsachy Weissman
March 2020

A collaboration on image compression between researchers and three high school students found human-powered image sharing proved more effective than an algorithm's work. Professor Tsachy Weissman realized the algorithm had hundreds of thousands of human engineering hours, but didn't include human-centric factors that three high schoolers had.

 

This was the seed for STEM to SHTEM– an internship program for high school students whose various backgrounds, brings tremendous benefit to the research collaboration.

 

The STEM to SHTEM program kicked off in 2019. 

All of the projects from summer 2019 are included in the "Journal for High Schoolers" which was produced by last year's interns and mentors. Several projects have resulted in papers submitted to scholarly journals, with one planning to be presented at the Human-Robot Interaction Conference in spring. The work also lives on in new collaborations between other research groups who may have remained unacquainted if not for STEM to SHTEM.

Professor Weissman, PhD candidates Cindy Nguyen and Kedar Tatwawadi are currently figuring out what workshops and presentations they and their colleagues can give to the interns this summer. Their goal is to offer sessions that are educational, fun and encouraging.

"During the process of designing what the program would look like, I thought about my experiences as a high school intern and as a first-generation, low-income undergraduate," said Cindy Nguyen (EE PhD candidate). "Being able to give other students the opportunity that I had is such a privilege."

With the program open for applications, the team hopes to draw broad interest from students – including those who lack confidence in their STEM skills, whose talents lie outside STEM or who aren't yet sure about their future academic plans after high school. The program also offers some financial support to students who would otherwise be unable to participate.

"We aim to give every student a taste of the college adventure," said Kedar Tatwawadi (EE PhD candidate). "It could inspire them to take that adventure on and, perhaps, they will even go for graduate studies."


2019 mentors and collaborators included producer and director Devon Baur, sketch artist Frank Hom, and professors Srabanti Chowdhury, Subhasish Mitra, Dorsa Sadigh, Debbie Senesky and Gordon Wetzstein, and the members of their labs.

Note on COVID-19 and STEM to SHTEM program: We plan to proceed with the program for the time being. If needed, we intend to take the program fully online (e.g. weekly lectures via video, mentoring meetings online, etc.) and possibly adapt the start and end date of the program to fit the summer schedules of high schools that are currently dismissed.


Related

image of EE professors Dwight Nishimura and John Pauly
February 2020

Professors Dwight Nishimura, John Pauly, and Albert Macovski lead the Magnetic Resonance Systems Research Lab (MRSRL) in Electrical Engineering. Their lab designs new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques and equipment for improved disease diagnosis and treatment. These technologies enable MRI scanning with greater speed, clarity, contrast, and comfort. Students and staff work with physicians on imaging solutions for major health problems such as cancer, heart disease, blood vessel disease, and joint pain.

Recently, Dwight and John joined the Medical and Scientific Advisory Board of HeartVista, a pioneer in AI-assisted MRI solutions. The company uses technology that originated in their research lab, MRSRL. Additional details on the MRSRL research can be found on the lab's website: mrsrl.stanford.eduBoth Dwight and John are recipients the highest honor from the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine – the Gold Medal.

Photo source: mrsrl.stanford.edu

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